time patriotism essay

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You may think that your students are only interested in fiction readingbut the truth is that children are fascinated by the world around them. Studies have long touted the benefits of teaching students how to read nonfiction. Nonfiction text helps students develop background knowledgewhich in turn assists them as they encounter more difficult reading throughout their school years. Nonfiction can also help students learn to read text features not often found in works of fiction, including headings, graphs, and charts. Students used to rely on nonfiction non fiction book report activities for research projects from science to art. With the rise of digital sources, many students choose to simply do their research online.

Time patriotism essay intermediate 2 computing homework

Time patriotism essay

Singing should communicate stories and stir emotions. When I sing, I sing from my soul. When I sing the national anthem for veterans standing before me, I sing with deep reverence and respect for both our beloved veterans and for our country.

I focus on their love of our nation. When they salute the flag or place their hands over their hearts, I imagine what patriotism might mean to them. What a gift their service was to our nation. I reflect that, tragically, countless veterans lost beloved friends during their tours of duty and so, for veterans, the national anthem must call to mind excruciating experiences, devastating losses, cherished memories, and a camaraderie that civilians can never comprehend.

I hold space in my heart for all of those powerful emotions as I prepare to sing, so that I may honor veterans in the way they should be revered. As I inhale, I reflect on what patriotism means to me. The seemingly infinite graves overlooking the English Channel, the solemn, serene memorial before me juxtaposed with the historical landing and battle which occurred 76 years prior, was incomprehensible.

Americans, about my age, disembarked from Higgins boats, encumbered with gear heavy enough to drown some GIs. American soldiers raced through the sea into a hail of machine-gun fire from fortified cliffs, as bullets maimed them and killed their friends. Yet these dauntless heroes battled impossibly forward despite their unimaginable terror. My parents asked us to take off our shoes, to feel the sand where so much American blood was shed in the name of freedom, in a solemn moment to mourn those who died to preserve democracy.

Patriotism means my favorite teacher, Mr. Walt Knight, a veteran, who, before dedicating his life to students, dedicated it to our country. Despite Mr. Knight left his buddies and walked across the street to exchange his two-dollar bill for two one-dollar bills. As Mr. Knight reached the other side of the street, the bar exploded, leaving his two friends in the ashes.

Patriotism means losing the people we love, saying unexpected goodbyes, and continuing through tragedy for the benefit of our nation. And patriotism means finding continued ways to serve beyond the battlefield, like Mr. Patriotism means I have the freedom to sing to a crowd of veterans.

I live a safe, wonderful existence because, through the efforts of every military branch, from the Marines who are the first line of safety, to the Army, who battle on land, to the Navy who protect the seas, the Air Force who protect the skies, and the Coast Guard, who protect the water, my safety and freedom are ensured thanks to their sacrifice during times of war and peace. Men and women risk their safety for the preservation of daily life in the U.

Patriotism means bravery, valor, strength, sacrifice, duty, perseverance, and a dedication to others, protecting everyone on American soil and abroad, from strangers to loved ones. Patriotism means standing up for those who need help.

Patriotism means loving this country and understanding that there is no greater nation on Earth. Patriotism is the best of what being American is. In times like these more than ever, it is critical to understand the importance of sacrifice for the greater good of our community.

We are currently facing a national crisis on an unprecedented scale that threatens our core ideals of liberty, freedom, and safety. We have been asked to give up our livelihoods and put our futures on hold in order to ensure that our community can weather the next few months and come out with the least damage possible. The United States has not seen a crisis to this scale in decades on our soil, and it is clearly one of those times that history will certainly remember. That sacrifice, that drive to give up parts of ourselves to make our home safer and stronger, is what I believe is at the core of patriotism.

Patriotism is the sense of pride and joy that we have in our nation that makes us do whatever we must to protect that nation and everyone in it. It is the idea that we are a part of something greater, and that we must do all that is in our power to preserve that thing for future generations long after we have passed on. Most Americans were lucky in that they could have this sense of pride in their country without ever having to sacrifice to protect it.

Before this year, most of us were comfortable with the fact that the United States was safe and secure enough that we could go about our daily lives without ever having to give up parts of ourselves for this great country. The trust we have in our military and government made us think that we would never have to sacrifice for the betterment of our nation. Unfortunately, that reality has changed.

We are now asked to give up our daily lives and put our future plans on hold in order to protect our community from a threat that cannot be seen. We are asked to sacrifice our freedom in order to protect our safety and the safety of our neighbors, family, and friends. We are called upon to be patriots, and to give up core aspects of ourselves in order to ensure that this country remains as great as ever.

Now is one of those times where average citizens can begin to understand the patriotism that drives the servicemen and women who have preserved the United States for so long. While we are now tasked with sitting on the couch all day, they have been tasked with putting their lives on the line to keep us safe. While our sacrifice involves lounging around watching Netflix, they have to face the harshest conditions in order to maintain our security. The meaning of patriotism is different for an autocratic country than a democratic one.

In autocracy, the lines between the country and the person ruling over it blurs. Patriotism for the country, in this case, translates into patriotism for that person. However, patriotism assumes a different connotation in a democracy, where the people of the country elect their government and where the government is accountable to the people. Love for the country, in this case, might not converge with love for the government. The value of patriotism demands that the citizens love their country, remain loyal and committed to the development of the country.

It is a feeling that should reside in the hearts of all the citizens of a country at all times. An inefficient, unpopular government will never be able to win the trust, love and support of the citizens. It binds people from diverse communities, religions and races together and gives them a sense of belonging, a sense of being rooted. The feeling is most strongly visible in the soldiers who sacrifice their lives for their countries.

Elected governments in a democracy are under constant scrutiny and, therefore, need to keep working efficiently for the welfare of the people. The government too needs to be patriotic and be guided solely by the interests of the country. As long as it does so, it will enjoy the support of the people of the country. The citizens of a country are under a moral obligation to harbour patriotic feelings towards their country.

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The referendum is the purest expression of this conception of democracy. Liberal democracy, by contrast, distinguishes between decisions that the popular majorities should make, either directly or through their elected representatives, and issues involving rights, which should not be subject to majority will. The defense of fundamental rights and liberties is not evidence of a democracy deficit no matter how intensely popular majorities may resent it.

Along with independent civil society, institutions such as constitutional courts give life to democracy, so understood. It is this conception of democracy on which I rely in the remainder of my remarks. Keller has put his finger on a dangerous tendency, one that I suspect most of us can feel within ourselves. Sometimes monsters masquerade as patriots and manipulate patriotic sentiments to serve their own ends.

Just as patriots can go astray, they can also acknowledge their mistakes and do their best to make reparations for them. No one ever accused Ronald Reagan of being deficient in patriotism, but he was the president who formally apologized to Japanese-Americans on behalf of the country for their unjust internment during World War II.

But just as patriots can go astray, they can also acknowledge their mistakes and do their best to make reparations for them. Or, if you prefer, we can see patriotism as a sentiment that needs principled regulation. Patriotism does not mean blind fidelity, no matter what. In sum: I can believe that my country has made serious mistakes that must be acknowledged and corrected without ceasing to be a patriot.

I can believe that other objects of regard my conscience, or God on occasion outrank my country without ceasing to be a patriot. The fact that zealous patriotism can have terrible consequences does not mean that reasonable and moderate patriotism does so. Despite these arguments, it is understandable that morally serious people may continue harbor doubts about the intrinsic value of a sentiment that can yield evil. Even so, it is possible to endorse patriotism as an instrumental good—as necessary to the preservation of political communities whose existence makes the human good possible.

Another well-known philosopher, George Kateb, hesitates to take even this step. Intellectuals, especially philosophers, should know better, Kateb insists. Their only ultimate commitment should be to Enlightenment-style independence of mind, not just for themselves, but as an inspiration to all. But Kateb is too honest an observer of the human condition to go that far. That is the basis on which a reasonable patriotism may be defined and defended. Yes, the individual community that makes moral conduct possible is embedded in an international system of multiple competing communities that invites, even requires, immoral behavior.

One more step, and I reach the end of this strand of my argument. The existence of multiple political communities is not just a fact that moral argument must take into account; it is preferable to the only non-anarchic alternative—a single global state. Dani Rodrik, a politically astute economist, spells out this case. There are many institutional arrangements, none obviously superior to others, for carrying out essential economic, social, and political functions. But some may be better suited than others to particular local circumstances.

Groups will strike varying balances between equality and opportunity, stability and dynamism, security and innovation. All this before we reach divisions of language, history, and religion. Individual countries struggle to contain these differences without repressing them. How likely is it that a single world government could preserve itself without autocracy or worse? These questions answer themselves.

If the human species best organizes and governs itself in multiple communities, and if each community requires devoted citizens to survive and thrive, then patriotism is not the way-station to the universal state. It is a permanent requirement for the realization of goods that human beings can know only in stable and decent polities.

One familiar line of objection to patriotism rests on the premise that partiality is always morally suspect because it violates, or at least abridges, universal norms. By treating equals unequally for morally arbitrary reasons, goes the argument, we give too much weight to some claims and too little to others. My son happens to be a fine young man; I cherish him for his warm, caring heart, among many other virtues.

I also cherish him above other children because he is my own. Am I committing a moral mistake? I would be if my love for my son led me to regard other children with indifference—for example, if I voted against local property taxes because he is no longer of school age. This is so because a certain degree of partiality is both permissible and justified. On what theory of human existence would that be the right or obligatory thing to do? But now the second example. In the process, my son will be late for school and miss an exam he has worked hard to prepare for.

Does anyone think that this harm would justify me in turning my back on the drowning boy? These considerations apply not only to individual agents, but also to governments. There are situations in which one country can prevent a great evil in another, and do so at modest cost to itself. In such circumstances, the good that can be done for distant strangers outweighs the burden of doing it. In this vein, Bill Clinton has said that his failure to intervene against the genocide in Rwanda was the biggest mistake of his presidency.

While it is hard some would say impossible to reduce this balance to rules, there is at least a shared framework—based on the urgency and importance of conflicting interests—to guide our reflections. As a rule of thumb, we can presume that because human beings tend too much toward partiality, we should be careful to give non-partial claims their due.

Sensing the danger of proving too much, the critics of patriotism draw back from the root-and-branch rejection of partiality. Instead, they try to drive a wedge between patriotism and other forms of attachment. George Kateb does not offer a generalized critique of partial attachments. Individuals are worthy of special attachments in a way that countries are not. That is why he works so hard to drive a wedge between love of parents and love of country. One can love these things reasonably, and many do.

I disagree. To be sure, a country is not a person, but it begs the question to say that love is properly directed only to persons. It abuses neither speech nor sense to say that I love my house and for that reason would feel sorrow and deprivation if disaster forced me to leave it.

I have had such an experience. Consider immigrants who arrive legally in the U. Their lives in their new country often are arduous, but they at least enjoy the protection of the laws, the opportunity to advance economically, and the right to participate in choosing their elected officials. Is it unreasonable for them to experience gratitude, affection, and the desire to perform reciprocal service for the country that has given them refuge? But here again, his conclusion does not follow from his premise.

Surely we can love people who are not responsible for our existence: parents love their children, husbands their wives. Besides, refugees may literally owe their continuing existence to countries that offer them sanctuary from violence. Is it less reasonable and proper to love the institutions that save our life than the individuals who give us life? As another philosopher, Eamonn Callan, has suggested, if patriotism is love of country, then the general features of love are likely to illuminate this instance of it.

To do that would be to surrender both intellectual and moral integrity. Many patriots spend their lives behind enemy lines abroad assuring the international safety of all. Other patriots, who may not wear a uniform, still devote their lives to programs across the country that maintain wellbeing. Health care workers, food bank employees, emergency service responders, mothers, fathers, teachers, government workers, and many more people. These patriots all have devotion to the success of their nation.

This undertaking cannot be done alone. Propping the entire nation upon stilts of success requires collaboration and alliance. Regular citizens working with the government, innocent civilians working with the armed forces, and the fortunate helping the needy. This community of selfless, devoted, and allied patriots described is the primary reason that the United States and other countries around the world are functioning. This is what patriotism means to me.

Singing properly is a combination of control, focus, and breath. But singing loses its value when the quality of sound is the primary goal. Singing should communicate stories and stir emotions. When I sing, I sing from my soul. When I sing the national anthem for veterans standing before me, I sing with deep reverence and respect for both our beloved veterans and for our country.

I focus on their love of our nation. When they salute the flag or place their hands over their hearts, I imagine what patriotism might mean to them. What a gift their service was to our nation. I reflect that, tragically, countless veterans lost beloved friends during their tours of duty and so, for veterans, the national anthem must call to mind excruciating experiences, devastating losses, cherished memories, and a camaraderie that civilians can never comprehend.

I hold space in my heart for all of those powerful emotions as I prepare to sing, so that I may honor veterans in the way they should be revered. As I inhale, I reflect on what patriotism means to me. The seemingly infinite graves overlooking the English Channel, the solemn, serene memorial before me juxtaposed with the historical landing and battle which occurred 76 years prior, was incomprehensible.

Americans, about my age, disembarked from Higgins boats, encumbered with gear heavy enough to drown some GIs. American soldiers raced through the sea into a hail of machine-gun fire from fortified cliffs, as bullets maimed them and killed their friends.

Yet these dauntless heroes battled impossibly forward despite their unimaginable terror. My parents asked us to take off our shoes, to feel the sand where so much American blood was shed in the name of freedom, in a solemn moment to mourn those who died to preserve democracy. Patriotism means my favorite teacher, Mr. Walt Knight, a veteran, who, before dedicating his life to students, dedicated it to our country.

Despite Mr. Knight left his buddies and walked across the street to exchange his two-dollar bill for two one-dollar bills. As Mr. Knight reached the other side of the street, the bar exploded, leaving his two friends in the ashes. Patriotism means losing the people we love, saying unexpected goodbyes, and continuing through tragedy for the benefit of our nation.

And patriotism means finding continued ways to serve beyond the battlefield, like Mr. Patriotism means I have the freedom to sing to a crowd of veterans. I live a safe, wonderful existence because, through the efforts of every military branch, from the Marines who are the first line of safety, to the Army, who battle on land, to the Navy who protect the seas, the Air Force who protect the skies, and the Coast Guard, who protect the water, my safety and freedom are ensured thanks to their sacrifice during times of war and peace.

Men and women risk their safety for the preservation of daily life in the U. Patriotism means bravery, valor, strength, sacrifice, duty, perseverance, and a dedication to others, protecting everyone on American soil and abroad, from strangers to loved ones. Patriotism means standing up for those who need help. Patriotism means loving this country and understanding that there is no greater nation on Earth. Patriotism is the best of what being American is. In times like these more than ever, it is critical to understand the importance of sacrifice for the greater good of our community.

We are currently facing a national crisis on an unprecedented scale that threatens our core ideals of liberty, freedom, and safety. We have been asked to give up our livelihoods and put our futures on hold in order to ensure that our community can weather the next few months and come out with the least damage possible. The United States has not seen a crisis to this scale in decades on our soil, and it is clearly one of those times that history will certainly remember.

That sacrifice, that drive to give up parts of ourselves to make our home safer and stronger, is what I believe is at the core of patriotism. Patriotism is the sense of pride and joy that we have in our nation that makes us do whatever we must to protect that nation and everyone in it.

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Respecting the American flag is another great way for patriotism to be demonstrated. The U. It is our guide to show respect for all those patriots that went before us. Examples of the flag code are not flying a ripped flag and not flying a flag after dark unless it is lit. In conclusion, there are many simple but meaningful ways we can demonstrate patriotism such as voting, supporting a veteran, and following and respecting the flag code.

Patriotism is one way we show we love our country and for me, patriotism is more than that. To me, patriotism is feeling unity with all people who love this country. One can show patriotism with their actions and words in many different ways, all of which have different impacts. How can patriotism be demonstrated? Patriotism can be demonstrated in people of all ages, for example, if you are an adolescent one can demonstrate patriotism by learning about their country.

Individuals can learn about things like voting, respecting the flag, learning about our symbols, jury duty, and laws. On the other hand, people who are 18 and older can use the things that they have learned about, to be educated voters and serve jury duty. One can also support the veterans by helping their families. Not only are the veterans fighting but their families are also serving. This may not seem like a lot, yet imagine the weight that is taken off their shoulders when they know their families are in good hands.

In conclusion, you can demonstrate patriotism in many different ways, these were only a few simple ways an average citizen can demonstrate patriotism. As you can see, it is not very hard to demonstrate these things. Some ways are more complex, such as joining juries or being involved in politics, and some ways can be as simple as hanging an American flag outside of your house. But which ways are the most meaningful? Which ways are the most important?

There is no correct answer to those questions. Truthfully, any way you demonstrate patriotism is important and can encourage others to do the same. Patriotism can be demonstrated in a wide variety of forms, including small yet sophisticated ways, like voting, watching parades, and respecting the president. If you want to be more immersed in patriotism, you can donate to or join groups and organizations that support and help the country.

Another common example of demonstrating patriotism is going to national parks, visiting memorials, and seeing national museums. Any person of any age, race, religion, and gender can demonstrate patriotism. Adults can serve in the military. Young children can learn about the country, and place their hand on their heart for the National Anthem.

If you demonstrate patriotism, other people will follow and do the same. Patriotism is essential to positive influences about your country. If there is an aspiring crisis in your country, showing strong acts of patriotism can keep yourself and others positive and hopeful.

Remember the easiest way to show patriotism is admiring, appreciating, and loving your country, that is the foundation of patriotism. Today, did you see someone stand up for the flag? Did you see someone who said thank you to a veteran?

A person saying they learned about our country's past and the wars? Saying thank you for your service can mean a lot to veterans. Truly realizing how much soldiers love our nation that they fought for, is incredible. Every soldier left everything behind, their family, friends, everything, to make sure they can give current and future Americans a free country.

Respecting the flag and saying the Pledge of Allegiance is a small, but huge way to show patriotism. Make sure you have your hat off, stand up, put your hand on your heart, head held high, and say the Pledge of Allegiance with pride.

Learning about the U. The wars were brutal and unforgiving, and our soldiers held through miraculously. The wars were no joke, and we survived them, learning about our history and past is thoughtful and considerate. After reading this, I hope you will learn more about our history, thank our veterans, and say the Pledge of Allegiance with pride.

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