essay the jungle upton sinclair

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You may think that your students are only interested in fiction readingbut the truth is that children are fascinated by the world around them. Studies have long touted the benefits of teaching students how to read nonfiction. Nonfiction text helps students develop background knowledgewhich in turn assists them as they encounter more difficult reading throughout their school years. Nonfiction can also help students learn to read text features not often found in works of fiction, including headings, graphs, and charts. Students used to rely on nonfiction non fiction book report activities for research projects from science to art. With the rise of digital sources, many students choose to simply do their research online.

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Essay the jungle upton sinclair

After reading two-hundred and ninety-four pages, it is evident that humans have been shaping the world over time and the world has been shaping us as well. A lot has changed since the industrial revolution, the time frame in which this novel takes place. Our food industries have improved, money value has risen, and job opportunities have expanded. Throughout The Jungle the reader follows an immigrant family on their journey of hardships and losses.

Although many immigrant families came to America in search of a better life, soon most found themselves barely surviving with no job, food, shelter, or money. As is the case of the family in The Jungle. The novel not only unveils the corruption of the political and economic system.

Critics often argue that Upton Sinclair, author of many classic American novels including The Jungle, was cynical and bitter even. In his book The Jungle, Sinclair, points out the flaws of the American dream. Many immigrants traveled thousands of miles aboard, cramped, disease infested, ships with hope of coming to this.

The Jungle written by Upton Sinclair does not only highlight the life of American workers but also uncovers the infleunce of capitalism in the US, where workers and employees were destined to fight for a living, while the upper-class reaped the benefits of national wealth.

The Jungle gives many examples of the. This book is called The Jungle. The Author or this book goes by the name of Upton Sinclair. The Jungle was published on February 26, Upton Sinclair is an American author with almost books which are based on many different genres. Sinclair is a journalist, novelist, as well as a political activist. Sinclair is most famous for this book. The Jungle is a novel that is based on the disgusting conditions of the US meatpacking industry, and the hardships of the labor that immigrant men and women.

In his work, The Jungle, Upton Sinclair depicts the brutal story of a migrant Lithuanian family and their new life in America. The novel brings to life the harsh reality that Jurgis Rudkus and his family faced everyday in the Chicago Stockyards, known as Packingtown. Their preconceived dreams of America were slowly crushed by their daily struggle to make a life for themselves and to simply survive.

Book Review. Over the course of the novel, Sinclair highlights certain portions of capitalist philosophy that he believes are inhumane or ironic, and he depicts capitalism to be an evil that leeches off of Jurgis and his family. Sinclair opens the story with the wedding feast of two central characters, Ona and Jurgis. As the story progresses, Sinclair tears down the seemingly perfect idea of the American dream piece by piece. In this seemingly methodical way, Sinclair sheds light on his contentions with capitalism, and he concludes by offering his alternative; socialism.

The last three chapters are largely a method by which Sinclair propagandizes his views, abandoning the narrative and offering his solution to the problems he has previously explored. This very nature of the book as a method of political propaganda renders a bias inevitable; the fact that it was written as a political weapon rather than a historical account of a time period guarantees that one side of the argument will be glorified and the other will be ignored.

Even though he uses legitimate evidence in order to construct his story, one must realize that ultimately, Sinclair is trying to convince the reader of a certain view, and that he has employed the use of fiction in many parts of the book. While the narrative does expose many horrific, sometimes hard-to-digest truths about the evils of capitalism, in the end, its form and function take away from its value as a complete historical account, as it fails to give the reader a complete and overall historical truth.

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Best resume design tips The hero is making bombs—and then he learns about Socialism. Even though The Jungle is a fictional novel, it described conditions that were real during the progressive era, such as working class poverty and harsh working conditions. Afterword to The Jungle. This novel discusses problems that are crucial not only to our country but to other countries that view the United States as a place of prosperity and success. Sinclair is a journalist, novelist, as well as a political activist. Better Essays.
Essay the jungle upton sinclair 206
Essay the jungle upton sinclair First of all, Sinclair shows clearly the wide gap between the employer and the employee. The police reacted immediately, when the life and health of a rich person was at stake. In his book The Jungle, Sinclair, top masters report topics out the flaws of the American dream. Throughout his upbringing, he was able to experience the way both write a disaster recovery plan poor and rich lived because of his parents and grandparents, respectively. That is why, despite our easy and valid objection to the breakdown of the narrative, The Jungle lives in our imaginations not in pieces but as a sympathy-stirring whole. As a salesman he probably came across as arrogant to try and compensate for his other shortcomings but he tried. Order your paper here.
Sociology essays At the same time, The Jungle gives multiple implications to the contemporary labor relations which are still vulnerable to the same pitfalls which persist because of the nature of the US capitalist system and traditions of the US labor relations. The Jungle written by Upton Sinclair does not only highlight the life of American workers but also uncovers the infleunce popular persuasive essay ghostwriters service uk capitalism persuasive essay topics about nature the US, where workers and employees were destined to fight for a living, while the upper-class reaped the benefits of national wealth. That is why, despite our easy and valid objection to the breakdown of the narrative, The Jungle lives in our imaginations not in pieces but as a sympathy-stirring whole. It is a libel on the United States inspectors who are employed in the packing-house and render sworn reports of their work to the Government. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, He is an American author who had an interest in addressing the improper conduct of the political and business class.

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In order to encourage me to be more vocal and assertive, when we broke up into groups to work on this book, the teacher made me a group leader. One member of my group male was aggressively stupid. The other two were varying degrees of comatose. The only thing I really remember of this book apart from the graphic descriptions of putrescence was this: At the beginning of each class, we had to answer check questions just to make sure we had done the assigned reading.

One of the questions was to list ways in which the factory workers died. One of the ways they died was by contracting tuberculosis. Obviously in the book, Sinclair uses the term consumption, which is what I told my group was an additional answer to the question. The aggressively stupid one turned to me and said very clearly: "You're so dumb, I should be the leader.

Consumption is when you eat. View all 4 comments. Nov 25, Thomas rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , read-for-college. Even teachers get things wrong. I remember throughout middle school and high school learning about The Jungle as the book intended to expose the American meatpacking industry.

And while it did to that, Upton Sinclair's mission - which I discussed quite a bit in my Social Protest Literature course - centered more on exposing the evils of capitalism. The public's reception of The Jungle exemplifies the doctrine of unintended consequences, as Sinclair himself writes "I aimed at the public's heart, Even teachers get things wrong. The public's reception of The Jungle exemplifies the doctrine of unintended consequences, as Sinclair himself writes "I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach.

We follow Jurgis and his family - immigrants from Lithuania - as they struggle in horrifying and disastrous ways to live the American dream. Sinclair hits us over and over with all the ways in which capitalism dehumanizes us, pits us against one another, and precludes any type of moral upward mobility.

Perhaps Sinclair's book did not achieve its expected goal because of Sinclair's unrelenting and somewhat bombastic prose. The public may have internalized the grossness of his descriptions of the meatpacking industry instead of Sinclair's more overarching indictment of capitalism. Overall, a worthwhile read for those interested in investigative fiction or books aimed to generate social protest.

Not the most subtle or stylistically-sophisticated book by any means, but one that remains relevant in regard to writing and activism. About halfway through, I've found the ills of the meat packing industry to be very much a secondary issue for Sinclair.

He certainly created found a proper setting. I've always had a soft spot for immigrants. Some managed to own their own homes out on Long Island, nothing grand, but solidly middle class. They had hard times in Brooklyn, but nothing like what Sinclair describes. The morass that his characters landed in is enough to make anyone with a heart weep.

IOW, the sheer number of hardships that lines up against them is too long to list. The grinding weight of them is practically unbearable to read about. This is something for us to remember today when we are facing similar immigration issues. They're desperate. Sinclair shows us that in this novel, although his point is weakened by taking things too far.

His version of Socialism sounded very much like the Communism of Russia, although I'm no expert in or student of gov't types. Make up your own mind on the label, I don't care. I was disappointed in the way the book ended in his political diatribe. The last half wasn't really worth plowing through, especially today, given the historical example of how the Russian's economy worked out under a similar system. He sees unions as ineffectual, doomed to failure due to the corruption throughout the entire system.

I'm glad I read this after the book. I don't much care for fanaticism. Once you feel the book is descending into the depths, cut your losses. As the animals are driven up the ramp into the slaughter house, killed, butchered and processed down to the last scraps of bone and hoof so too an immigrant family will be cozened, cheated, see their dreams shattered and families broken up.

It is one of a number of novels in which the slaughter house is both a metaphor for modern society and foreshadows the fate of the characters, which I suppose is appropriate in that the Chicago slaughterhouse, in which the incoming beasts were de-constructed As the animals are driven up the ramp into the slaughter house, killed, butchered and processed down to the last scraps of bone and hoof so too an immigrant family will be cozened, cheated, see their dreams shattered and families broken up.

It is one of a number of novels in which the slaughter house is both a metaphor for modern society and foreshadows the fate of the characters, which I suppose is appropriate in that the Chicago slaughterhouse, in which the incoming beasts were de-constructed into as many component or marketable parts as possible was one of the inspirations for the Detroit assembly line along which components were once upon a time built up into four wheeled motor cars.

Mirror image processes which might from a certain point of view be taken as epitomising the twentieth century experience. Either way one finds oneself sent along a pre ordained line whether to destruction or to be released into the community on parole, perhaps not as a model-T, until the bell toils for you.

If we take Sinclair's somewhat Weberian view of the culmination of the process of rationalisation and glance on to or even Brave New World , one might wonder why bother going to the trouble of erecting political structures to channel people first along the assembly line and then the dis-assembly line with such involved and complex mechanisms when one can achieve equal destruction simply through the apparently normal and acceptable operation of efficiency and rational economics.

It is only the bleat for which no economic use can be found. View all 13 comments. It is impossible for me to review this without appearing to be pissy. The work itself is barely literary. The Jungle explores and illustrates the conditions of the meatpacking industry. Its presence stirred outcry which led to much needed reforms.

Despite the heroics of tackling the Beef Trust, Upton Sinclair saw little need in the actual artful. The protagonist exists only to conjoin the various pieces of reportage. There isn't much emotional depth afforded, the characters' motivations often ap It is impossible for me to review this without appearing to be pissy.

There isn't much emotional depth afforded, the characters' motivations often appear skeptical. I was left shaking my head on many a turn, especially towards the end where entire speeches from the American Socialist party compete with esoteric findings of left-leaning social scientists from the era around Despite these shortcomings as a novel, the opening half is often harrowing.

Graphic descriptions of hellish work conditions, poor food quality and lack of social safety net reached towards a very personal conclusion: I am EVER so grateful that I didn't live years ago and was forced to compete economically under those conditions. Jun 07, P. The story of Jurgis and his family who came from Lithuania to work in the slaughterhouses of Chicago in the early 20th century. Doing some preparatory research for his novel, writer Upton Sinclair has spent some time as a worker in Packingtown, Chicago.

This novel exposes the appalling living conditions migrants faced once they settled : exploited like cattle by a full-blown cartel that brings together industrialists, real estate developers, bar owners, transport companies, state officials, poli The story of Jurgis and his family who came from Lithuania to work in the slaughterhouses of Chicago in the early 20th century. This novel exposes the appalling living conditions migrants faced once they settled : exploited like cattle by a full-blown cartel that brings together industrialists, real estate developers, bar owners, transport companies, state officials, police officers and magistrates.

Though its scope and ambition are much wider, the book is mainly acclaimed for having pushed the US Congress to enact laws in favour of a strengthened sanitary control in the food processing industry. Oct 07, Jonathan Ashleigh rated it liked it. This was a graphic look into the world of meat and it may have been the original Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal , but that just isn't what I am looking for in a book. Feb 01, Owlseyes rated it really liked it Shelves: socialist-author , us-lit.

The main scene being the marriage of year-old, blue-eyed Ona, running into tears often, …with Jurgis, a much older man. Special attention has been given to the description of the characters dancing or just chatting over the table; but center-stage remains the trio-band moving, sometimes, over the room!

The band tunes make the minds and hearts of those attending to recall Lithuania. The author, from the very beginning, points to the work aspects of these people. The book had an impact on the denunciation of bad work conditions and the promulgation of appropriate laws to correct these situations in America, in the beginning of the 20th century. Oct 05, J. This is an incredible story of the workers and families of the Chicago stockyards in the early 20th century.

With the way working conditions were for average Americans at this time, is it any wonder that authors like Sinclair and Jack London looked toward Socialism as a means to an end? I'm not a Socialist, but these were pretty terrible times in our country when men and women were injured or killed on the job, and wages were a mere pittance. I still think about this book 14 years after I read it. View all 5 comments. Things not to do: -tug on Superman's cape -spit in the wind -discuss The Jungle extensively in your junior year literature class directly before lunchtime on hot dog day -mess around with Jim I still don't eat hot dogs.

And I ate hot dogs up until then, despite having uncles who worked at the hot dog factory that weren't the most finger-rich of individuals. Re-read in for Gapers Block book club. View 2 comments. What a disservice that this book is mostly read and remembered as a mere historical reference and expose on socialism and the meat-packing industry!

The final four chapters which lapse into doctrine, preaching, and recruitment don't help any in casting off the label, but otherwise the book goes well beyond the Socialist politics which motivated Sinclair to write it. The first three hundred pages focus on hardened descriptions of the physical and emotional tragedy of working class immigrants losi What a disservice that this book is mostly read and remembered as a mere historical reference and expose on socialism and the meat-packing industry!

The first three hundred pages focus on hardened descriptions of the physical and emotional tragedy of working class immigrants losing everything in the face of overwhelming economic adversity. While the book can also be criticized for its somewhat higgeldy-piggeldy and hodgepodge organization, as well as forgetting that readers and characters need to breathe non-toxic air on occasion or eat a pickle not tainted with formaldehyde once in a fortnight without frostbite , the heavy force of constant tragedy never lets up and who can dispute its power or basis in reality?

To read Sinclair's lucid, almost poetic, description of the slaughterhouses in Chapter 3, or the lard-producing toxic creek, hush money for tubucular steers, and embalmed beef productions of Chapter 9, makes Dickens' melodramatic bugger tales and Zola's impecunious driftwood seem like lullabyes. There is no consumption without blood, but ironically those who feign the greatest fear of blood often consume the most.

Who wants to get their diamond ring dirty or imagine where it came from? As such, The Jungle would be particularly excellent reading when stuck between the cell phone calls of mall shoppers on their way to get their Zoloft prescription filled. At least they won't be eating vienna sausages or potted ham. Feb 16, Jason Pettus rated it it was ok Shelves: classic , politics , immigrants , early-modernism. Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.

I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally. The CCLaP In which I read for the first time a hundred so-called "classics," then write reports on whether or not they deserve the label Essay The Jungle , by Upton Sinclair The story in a nutshell: Much of today's plot recap was cribbed from Wikipedia, for reasons that will become clearer be Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.

The CCLaP In which I read for the first time a hundred so-called "classics," then write reports on whether or not they deserve the label Essay The Jungle , by Upton Sinclair The story in a nutshell: Much of today's plot recap was cribbed from Wikipedia, for reasons that will become clearer below.

Originally published in , Upton Sinclair's The Jungle is a sprawling look at the typical immigrant experience in America back then, before most of the laws regarding things like workplace safety, minimum wage and city zoning had been created; following a family of twelve who have recently arrived in Chicago from their troubled home of Lithuania, Sinclair's main point is to show that, unlike the rose-tinted tales of gold-paved streets and self-determination that were the common narrative among capitalists back then, in fact an unregulated free-market system is designed from its very core to exploit the poor and uneducated, that in fact such a system wouldn't even work if it wasn't for the ease in which such people can be manipulated and taken advantage of.

And so do we watch in growing horror as our hapless English-challenged hero Jurgis Rudkus first gets swindled out of all his money, then gets evicted from a slum, then faces a living nightmare in his job at the infamous Chicago Stockyards, then has his wife die during childbirth because they can't afford a doctor, then has his son die by literally drowning in mud in the middle of a public street, then becomes a bitter drifter and hobo, before finally having his soul saved by almost accidentally falling in with a group of socialist agitators, the book ending on a bright note as our author stand-in envisions out loud a future world that is fair and equal to all.

That's an astounding reaction to a simple, small melodrama by a semi-obscure writer, the equivalent perhaps of a random tech-blogger in North Dakota singlehandedly convincing Congress to declare the internet a public utility and ban all private cable companies; and the reason the book managed to accomplish this, they say, is because of being so powerful and heartbreaking, one of the best examples you'll ever find of the then-new "Social Realist" literary style which would go on to inspire pretty much an entire generation of politically motivated authors in the s and '30s.

A book that does exactly what it aims to do -- that is, make its readers angry and disgusted at the appalling way blue-collar workers were treated in an age before social-welfare laws -- The Jungle is a prime example of the novel format's ability to do things besides just tell an entertaining tale, an ability that was only being seriously explored in this format for the very first time in these years, yet another reason this groundbreaker should be considered an undeniable classic that every person should read before they die.

The argument against: To understand the problem in general with The Jungle , say its critics, simply look at that specific tale its fans tell about it inspiring the formation of the FDA, and how that's not really all of the story when you stop and examine it; how as even Sinclair himself lamented many times in his later years, the whole point of his book was supposed to be to show off the inherent evil of a capitalist middle class and to inspire a violent socialist revolution to overcome them, while the reaction from the actual capitalist middle class was to be horrified at the condition of the food they were putting into their mouths, while continuing to not give a toss about the people who actually worked at these factories, or about any of the other 75 percent of this novel that doesn't have to directly do with the subject of workplace cleanliness.

And so while it's admirable that the book had the kind of real-world influence that it did, its critics claim, that's really something more for history class than the world of the arts; and that the novel taken just on its own is actually pretty terrible, an overly serious doom-n-gloomer that never just makes its points when it can instead write those points down on a wooden two-by-four and then beat you in the back of the head repeatedly with it as hard as humanly possible.

And sheesh, the less we talk about the twenty-page literal sermon on socialism that Sinclair uses to end the book, the better. A writer who these days would be just as unknown as the hundreds of other hacky schlockmeisters churning out "poor lil' immigrant" stories in those same years, if it hadn't been for its accidental success in exposing the meatpacking industry at the exact moment in history when it needed to be, The Jungle is certainly a book to be admired but not necessarily to be read anymore, say its critics, and it's the perpetual assigning of this badly-written book in high-school lit classes that's partly to blame for so many Americans despising literature by the time they're done with school.

My verdict: So leaving aside today the question of their actual politics which to be clear, I'm also not a fan of , I've discovered over the years a big common problem with most of the artistic projects made by radical liberals, an issue that came up yet again while I was reading John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath for this essay series last year; namely, that radical liberals tend to lack even the slightest understanding of subtlety or humor, which makes nearly every artistic project ever made by a radical liberal from Great Depression novels to Michael Moore documentaries a joyless, patronizing chore, not enjoyable on its own but something we're usually literally forced to endure, because it's supposedly important and good for us and beneficial to society.

Although to be fair, most artistic projects by radical conservatives suffer from the exact same problems; it's not the left or right I have a particular problem with, but rather those who claim that a political purpose excuses an artistic project from needing to have any artistic merit. And so it is with The Jungle as well, which I plainly confess is one of the handful of books in this essay series I eventually gave up on long before actually finishing, after first spending an entire month reading it and still not being able to choke down even fifty pages of the dreck.

And to make it clear that I'm not the only one who feels this way, let's remember that no less than TIME magazine once called Sinclair "a man with every gift except humor and silence;" because that in a nutshell is what reading The Jungle is like, a ponderous accidental self-parody that is just so unrelenting and overly obvious in portraying the inner sweetness and outer misery of its main characters, you can't help sometimes but to laugh at inappropriate moments at its sheer sense of outrageousness.

Like I said, there used to be literally thousands of such writers, and hundreds of them once nationally famous, back when the entire "Social Realism" movement reached its height in the s through '30s, and now with all but a handful of them completely forgotten by society and history at large; and that's for the same reason that only a handful of poetry slammers from the s and early s will be remembered a hundred years from now, the same reason that we humans compile these kinds of "classics" lists in the first place, because ultimately what entertains a crowd of contemporaries in the heat of the original moment is far from the same thing that makes a piece of writing stay relevant for years and decades afterwards.

The simple fact is that The Jungle is not even an ounce better than any of those other hundreds of forgotten melodramas that were cranked out in those same years, and that it really is only remembered at all anymore because of the effect it had on the real topic of workplace hygiene; and I agree with its critics that this isn't nearly enough of a reason to consider a book a timeless classic, which is why I firmly come down in the negative on the subject today. Definitely check it out if it sounds up your alley, but feel more than free to skip if you don't and still consider yourself a decent human being.

Is it a classic? No And don't forget that the first 33 essays in this series are now available in book form! View all 7 comments. Shelves: modern-classic , audiobook , american-literature , s , sociology , books-to-read-before-you-die , chicago , american-history. With a hundred years of hindsight, we've learned so little. Upton Sinclair's The Jungle is famous for disgusting America with its tales of meat packing workers falling into vats and rendered into lard, and all the things that went into sausages and tinned beef.

Cigar butts and poisoned rats not even being the most disgusting ingredients But as Sinclair said about his most famous book, "I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach. It's about the crushing brutality of capitalism, and the problems of unregulated accumulation of wealth.

No wonder that Americans prefer the less political vegetarian version. Although Sinclair was a muckraking socialist with an obvious agenda, The Jungle is still a compelling novel in its own right. Jurgis Rudkus is a Lithuanian immigrant who comes to America with his young wife Ona and his extended family of in-laws. Initially believing they have found the promised land of opportunity and plenty, they are quickly taken in by various schemes meant to impoverish, indebt, and enslave immigrants like them.

At first only Jurgis has to work in Chicago's meatpacking district. He is young and strong and believes hard work will be rewarded, and those who warn him of how the meatpackers will use him up and dispose of him are lazy whiners. Of course, he soon discovers otherwise. The family undergoes one mishap after another, until within a year, even the children are reduced to selling newspapers on the street and still they are all barely staying alive.

Then things get worse, and worse, and worse. Jurgis is a modern-day Job, with no God to blame his troubles on, only capitalism. He has several ups and downs, but every time he catches a break, it's quickly followed by yet another brutal smackdown. Sinclair was trying to make the reader feel sorry for Jurgis and his poor family view spoiler [all of whom end up dead, prostituted, or beggars by the end of the book hide spoiler ] , and you will. The poor man just cannot win, and if he makes mistakes and chooses the less noble path when given a choice, it's pretty hard to judge him if you've never been homeless on the streets of Chicago in the wintertime.

The Jungle is a grimly detailed look at early 20th century America. Sinclair was muckraking, so obviously he's showing the ugliest bits of America he can, but history proved that most of what he was alleging was true, even if his conclusions were questionable. Even if you are strongly anti-socialist, The Jungle is an eye-opening story, and still relevant after all these years.

If you think that the horrors depicted in this book are relics of a previous era, just remember that to the extent that the very worst of these abuses are now curbed somewhat by government regulations, those government regulations are exactly what "free market" advocates hate and want to abolish.

Knocking one star off because while Sinclair mostly kept his didacticism in check throughout the book, using gripping drama and only a little bit of exposition to arouse the horror he intended, the last chapter was nothing but socialist sermonizing, making it less a climax than the author climbing onto a soapbox to deliver his moral. I found the first half of the book better than the last half. It turns into a tract proselytizing socialism.

Upton Sinclair has a message to deliver. The message is loud and clear. The first half focuses upon an immigrant family from Lithuania. Twelve people - six kids and six adults, two of whom get married. These two are Jurgis and Ona. The central protagonist is Jurgis. We follow him from the beginning of the book to the end. We watch Jurgis and Ona and the other six adults in their struggle I found the first half of the book better than the last half.

We watch Jurgis and Ona and the other six adults in their struggle to survive. They have little education, no money and cannot speak English. They come to America with high hopes All twelve of them? Read and see. This family and this couple may be viewed as particular individuals, but in reality they represent just a sample of the thousands who immigrated to the burgeoning American cities in the first decade of the s. Rapid industrialization led to exploitation of workers, corruption and impossible living conditions.

It is this that is the central focus of the book. This particular family came to the Chicago stockyards, and thus the secondary theme is the unsanitary conditions of the meatpacking industry. This book caused such public uproar that President Theodore Roosevelt was forced to investigate meat packing facilities. Both themes are equally upsetting to read about.

In the beginning of the novel there is hope. Lithuanian wedding traditions are wonderfully described. This helps balance the gruesome depiction of the slaughterhouse which, meticulously described, is hard to read, but not long. Upton Sinclair first published the story in serial format in in the socialist newspaper Appeal to Reason.

In it was published as a book, but it was condensed, shortened from the original thirty-six to thirty-one chapters. The reasons for the changes are disputed. Some say to make it more acceptable to capitalist views. Others say that the author himself wanted to tighten it to make it more engaging. The Blackstone Audio version I listened to has thirty-one chapters and I really do not think a more detailed rendition is necessary.

Grover Garner does an excellent narration. Good speed, clear and beyond reproach. He intones different dialects perfectly. He captures the urgency of the text and the culminating speech, with which the story ends, wonderfully. View all 11 comments. A book that changed laws in America Jun 08, Tau rated it did not like it Shelves: 1-star , classics , Thank god this wasn't required reading in high school because I would have lost my mind.

View 1 comment. As the book portrays these harsh conditions and exploited lives it also describes nauseating health violations and unsanitary practices in the American meat packing industry. It is this aspect of the novel that resulted in historic legislation that eventually led to the formation of the U.

Food and Drug Administration. At this point the book's narrative is barely two thirds complete. The story's protagonist is devastated by the death of his wife and son and tries to escape his sorrowful and miserable life by escaping to the life of a hobo. After awhile he returned to Chicago and lived through a variety of activities through which he learns about the workings of power in Chicago that contribute to making life difficult for working people like him.

Through the descriptions of his activities the book demonstrates the corrupt relationship of crime, politics, and business in Chicago at that time. The following excerpt describes the situation. It's a lengthy excerpt because there's a lot to describe. The city, which was owned by an oligarchy of business men, being nominally ruled by the people, a huge army of graft was necessary for the purpose of effecting the transfer of power. Twice a year, in the spring and fall elections, millions of dollars were furnished by the business men and expended by this army; meetings were held and clever speakers were hired, bands played and rockets sizzled, tons of documents and reservoirs of drinks were distributed, and tens of thousands of votes were bought for cash.

And this army of graft had, of course, to be maintained the year round. The leaders and organizers were maintained by the business men directly—aldermen and legislators by means of bribes, party officials out of the campaign funds, lobbyists and corporation lawyers in the form of salaries, contractors by means of jobs, labor union leaders by subsidies, and newspaper proprietors and editors by advertisements.

The rank and file, however, were either foisted upon the city, or else lived off the population directly. There was the police department, and the fire and water departments, and the whole balance of the civil list, from the meanest office boy to the head of a city department; and for the horde who could find no room in these, there was the world of vice and crime, there was license to seduce, to swindle and plunder and prey.

The law forbade Sunday drinking; and this had delivered the saloon-keepers into the hands of the police, and made an alliance between them necessary. The law forbade prostitution; and this had brought the "madames" into the combination. All of these agencies of corruption were banded together, and leagued in blood brotherhood with the politician and the police; more often than not they were one and the same person,—the police captain would own the brothel he pretended to raid, the politician would open his headquarters in his saloon.

On election day all these powers of vice and crime were one power; they could tell within one per cent what the vote of their district would be, and they could change it at an hour's notice. The story told by this book is so depressing that I couldn't help but wonder how the author was going the end the story.

Surely he would find a way of adding a bit of optimism. Sure enough the author provides a vision for the future. It's called Socialism. One evening the story's protagonist happens to attend a speech promoting the socialist cause. The text for the equivalent of about a half hour speech is included in the book. It's clear that this is the message that the author wants to convey. Below I have included the beginning of this speech because I think it summarizes perfectly the life of our protagonist up to this point.

And so you return to your daily round of toil, you go back to be ground up for profits in the world-wide mill of economic might! To toil long hours for another's advantage; to live in mean and squalid homes, to work in dangerous and unhealthful places; to wrestle with the specters of hunger and privation, to take your chances of accident, disease, and death.

And each day the struggle becomes fiercer, the pace more cruel; each day you have to toil a little harder, and feel the iron hand of circumstance close upon you a little tighter. Months pass, years maybe—and then you come again; and again I am here to plead with you, to know if want and misery have yet done their work with you, if injustice and oppression have yet opened your eyes!

So the book ends with a variety of conversations that defend the cause of socialism. The book suggests that support for it is trending up and that eventually will win nationwide popular support. So that's how things looked in when this book was published. This is a shocking story about the meat packing industry. The things that ended up in the meat. It was also hard to hear what the workers went through and how this family struggled just to survive.

How their food was filled with nasty things, how people swindled them. It was a hard life back then for immigrants. Very good book to learn a little bit about America's history. Readers also enjoyed. About Upton Sinclair. Upton Sinclair. Upton Beall Sinclair, Jr. He achieved popularity in the first half of the twentieth century, acquiring particular fame for his classic muckraking novel, The Jungle To gather information for the novel, Sinclair spent seven weeks undercover working in the meat packing plants of Chicago.

These direct experiences expos Upton Beall Sinclair, Jr. These direct experiences exposed the horrific conditions in the U. The Jungle has remained continuously in print since its initial publication. Four years after the initial publication of The Brass Check , the first code of ethics for journalists was created.

Time magazine called him "a man with every gift except humor and silence. More lessons come from their childhood because people are not old enough to think carefully. One of the most unforgettable experience happened to me when I was 10 years old. It gave me a lesson that would go with me forever. My story starts with rescuing my best friend,. What an unfortunate experience! Today was the day that I have been waited for my entire year.

That is correct. And the good thing about it, is that I do not have to pay any accommodation fee because my friend had offered me a. Using one of the themes below as a starting point, write about a person, event, or experience that helped you define one of your values or in some way changed how you approach the world.

The Universal Refugee Experience This essay is about the universal refugee experience and the hardships that they have to go through on their journey. Ha and the other refugees all encounter similar curiosities of overcoming the finding of that back again peaceful consciousness in the. As a result, Traveling is not just an experience or something to do, it is something beautiful that educates, enlightens, humbles, heals us. Travel brings experiences that cannot be had by reading or learning from others about the places visited.

In fact, many of us need to see, taste and touch to benefit from an experience. Frankly, it is not enough to read about the Great wall of China, we need to touch the stones that were laid. Our main objective since our success as a storefront; is to provide an easily accessible, all in one platform which gives users the ability to book, organize, keep record and review their experiences via an online portal their own way, at their best convenience.

Our services. Plus, I have this desire to constant improve the overall policies for the ideal of good government. I came from a small town in the east and moved to one of major cities in the United States. White illustrates the author's childhood memories with description and imagery theme but have different personal experiences and issues. Dillard depicts her childhood from the age of five through high school, in 's America.

According to Dillard, to find the source of happiness, one must resist the world to try to seal that character.

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This novel gives the reader an inside look into to the struggles of numerous European immigrants as they ventured to America during the early 's. Sinclair depicts the disturbing and emotional. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair was published in After reading two-hundred and ninety-four pages, it is evident that humans have been shaping the world over time and the world has been shaping us as well.

A lot has changed since the industrial revolution, the time frame in which this novel takes place. Our food industries have improved, money value has risen, and job opportunities have expanded. Throughout The Jungle the reader follows an immigrant family on their journey of hardships and losses.

Although many immigrant families came to America in search of a better life, soon most found themselves barely surviving with no job, food, shelter, or money. As is the case of the family in The Jungle. The novel not only unveils the corruption of the political and economic system. Critics often argue that Upton Sinclair, author of many classic American novels including The Jungle, was cynical and bitter even.

In his book The Jungle, Sinclair, points out the flaws of the American dream. Many immigrants traveled thousands of miles aboard, cramped, disease infested, ships with hope of coming to this. The Jungle written by Upton Sinclair does not only highlight the life of American workers but also uncovers the infleunce of capitalism in the US, where workers and employees were destined to fight for a living, while the upper-class reaped the benefits of national wealth.

The Jungle gives many examples of the. This book is called The Jungle. The Author or this book goes by the name of Upton Sinclair. The Jungle was published on February 26, Upton Sinclair is an American author with almost books which are based on many different genres. Sinclair is a journalist, novelist, as well as a political activist. Sinclair is most famous for this book. The Jungle is a novel that is based on the disgusting conditions of the US meatpacking industry, and the hardships of the labor that immigrant men and women.

His employer did not even try to offer him some compensations. Therefore, his employer viewed him as a mere tool that he used for his personal enrichment. The owner of the company was interested in increase of his wealth and he did grow richer, while workers kept living in poverty struggling for survival and having no social security that means that they could not count on any support from the part of the company or government, if they suffered injuries, fell ill or retired.

In fact, she had no other choice because the work was the only way for her to survive. However, this story revealed roots of problems that eventually led to the Great Depression. Sinclair shows that the US had systematic, intrinsic pitfalls that were deep-rooted in the American socioeconomic system based on principles of open market economy and capitalism.

At this point, it is worth mentioning the fact that employees were in a disadvantaged position in all industries. For example, when Jurgis experienced the work of a farm worker, he found out that farm workers had no chance for stable and good life based on high income because farmers need them as long as they need their labor and this is the case of all industries.

This trend was very strong during the industrial revolution and the early 20 th century in the US. More important, this trend persists today. The major problem of the capitalist system uncovered by Sinclair and that really existed in the early 20 th century as well as it exists now is the problem of the social injustice caused by the focus of employers on their well-being regardless of needs of employees.

In fact, the only purpose of employers described by Sinclair was to maximize their profits. This is why they employed children, did not care about workplace safety and health of their employees. Instead, they viewed their employees as mere commodities, which they used to grow richer. Moreover, the state supported employers and stood for their interests rather than for interests of employees.

Jurgis was arrested immediately for his attempt to revenge on the rapist. The police reacted immediately, when the life and health of a rich person was at stake. On the other hand, the police did nothing to investigate the case of the rape and prosecute the rapist. This case is the evidence that the socioeconomic injustice and the privileged position of the rich, on the one hand, and the oppressed position of the poor, on the other, was maintained by the state through the criminal justice system, laws and policies conducted by the state.

Such injustice could be traced throughout the history of the US, especially starting from the industrial revolution, when social inequalities became particularly obvious due to the fast enrichment of the few at cost of the pauperization of a large part of the US society. Thus, the book Jungle by Upton Sinclair reveals the social injustice that persisted in the US in the early 20 th century.

Upton Sinclair shows the desperate position of the working class in the US and clearly indicates the shift to socialism as the only solution to the problem of social injustice. In this regard, his solution is debatable but the point is that problems raised by Sinclair in his book were and, to a certain extent, are relevant and affect many people.

The economic disparity and the unfair redistribution of the national wealth is the major problem that causes other issues and widens gaps between the rich and the poor in the US. Essay on The Jungle Upton Sinclair The condition of the working class in the US at the beginning of the 20 th century was extremely challenging since workers had to struggle for survival on the daily bases that can be clearly seen from The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.

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Over the course of the novel, Sinclair highlights certain portions of capitalist philosophy that he believes are inhumane or ironic, and he depicts capitalism to be an evil that leeches off of Jurgis and his family. Sinclair opens the story with the wedding feast of two central characters, Ona and Jurgis.

As the story progresses, Sinclair tears down the seemingly perfect idea of the American dream piece by piece. In this seemingly methodical way, Sinclair sheds light on his contentions with capitalism, and he concludes by offering his alternative; socialism. The last three chapters are largely a method by which Sinclair propagandizes his views, abandoning the narrative and offering his solution to the problems he has previously explored.

This very nature of the book as a method of political propaganda renders a bias inevitable; the fact that it was written as a political weapon rather than a historical account of a time period guarantees that one side of the argument will be glorified and the other will be ignored. Even though he uses legitimate evidence in order to construct his story, one must realize that ultimately, Sinclair is trying to convince the reader of a certain view, and that he has employed the use of fiction in many parts of the book.

While the narrative does expose many horrific, sometimes hard-to-digest truths about the evils of capitalism, in the end, its form and function take away from its value as a complete historical account, as it fails to give the reader a complete and overall historical truth.

This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers. You can order our professional work here. We use cookies to offer you the best experience. You cannot copy content from our website. If you need this sample, insert an email and we'll deliver it to you. Only on Eduzaurus. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. Download essay. Need help with writing assignment?

Hire writer. Essay due? We'll write it for you! Although the newspaper serialization proceeded straightforwardly, the publishing plot soon began to thicken. A notice for April 15 offered the previously published chapters for thirty cents, these chapters and five more having been published separately in the April issue no. Except for one amusing puff—a James W. In it, the Appeal to Reason is given a plug, the virtues of socialism are cried up, and, with regard to plot, Jurgis is caught by the police when he is spotted at a Socialist rally.

With the final appearance of The Jungle in the Appeal , notice is given that the balance of The Jungle will be mailed to anyone who requests it on a postcard. It seems apparent, then, that sometime later in the summer of Sinclair began to suffer the difficult problem of resolving the plot of his novel. The family of immigrants had been ground up like so much raw meat, Jurgis crushed and embittered. Then what? He could not, on the other hand, use the facile tricks of serial writing that he had learned as a hack writer.

No deus ex machina could be rushed to the scene to pluck the protagonist from his seemingly inevitable doom. Nor was this book a historical novel like Manassas , in which the denouement could be selected and then applied from the stockroom of the settled past. Characteristically, Sinclair renewed himself, at least to some measure of health, through action. During the summer of he set about founding the Intercollegiate Socialist Society. Activities connected with the Society kept him busy until early November, at least, at which point he was able to complete the manuscript of his neglected book.

Sinclair had had to make the history that he could then exploit for the purposes of his fiction. Five publishers, including Macmillan, turned down the manuscript before Doubleday, Page accepted it. On February 26, , the two first editions were published, the earliest sheets in the run being bound for sale by Doubleday, Page.

The Jungle was widely noticed in the popular press, sometimes as a literary event, sometimes as a news story. Predictably, conservative publications denounced the book. It is a libel on the United States inspectors who are employed in the packing-house and render sworn reports of their work to the Government.

It is a libel on the workers in the packinghouses, many of whom are people of intelligence, thrift, and genuine worth and merit who own their homes, educate their children and live lives that are above reproach. It is a libel on the men of brain and power who inaugurated these plants and who serve the public and give work to thousands. It is an insult to the intelligent people of America who are asked to read it. I should think the Beef Trust would buy it up at any price—or you, if they could.

Sinclair, concerned that official visitors would not get the full truth, barraged the President with advice about how to proceed. Whatever political differences separated the two men, when the report of Labor Commissioner Charles P. These acts became law on June 30, , the culmination of a quarter of a century of investigation into the adulteration of foodstuffs and patent medicines by Dr. Americans have always responded to writing that calls attention to discrepancies between the ideal and the actual, but with the growth of literacy and the spread of mass-circulation magazines and newspapers at the turn of the century, shocking news about corporate and political wrongdoing—usually interrelated—became big business.

No area of American business or government, no abuse of power was safe from the forerunners of what are familiar today as investigative reporters. Sinclair had inadvertently discovered an important principle of modern-day reform: involve the public in the pain caused by the deficiency in need of remedy.

A convincing case can also be made that The Jungle was immediately appealing because it showed more than any other novel of protest the structural, interlocking nature of corruption in American life: the interdependence of urban politics and urban crime; the symbiosis of corporate graft and precinct patronage; the direct linkage of the disintegration of the family, alcoholism, ill health, and despair.

Efficiency, competitiveness, and materialism, Sinclair showed, were worshiped at great social cost. The Jungle revealed dramatically the consequences of the convergence of the rapid spread of technology, the flood of immigration, the urbanization of the population, the centralization of finance, and the domination of government by business.

Why, though, does The Jungle survive as a classic? The story The Jungle tells is of the Fall of the House of Rudkus—of how a peasant family from Lithuania comes to America determined to make a better life, and of how it is ineluctably drawn into the gears of competitive capitalism and chewed up by what Sinclair characterized as predatory greed. This story, of course, is the archetypal American narrative of disappointed expectations—the familiar American story of failure, of soured hopes, of emotional alienation and cultural confusion in place of community and identity.

The Jurgis Rudkus myth of failure is the other side of the Horatio Alger myth of success. Underneath the despair, however, is the even more profoundly American story of survival against great odds: Ishmael in Moby-Dick eludes disaster as an orphan riding a coffin; Huck Finn evades the logic of his drift into the heart of darkness by lighting out for the Territory. Finally, Sinclair created a masterpiece that is of continuing interest not only for what it shows us about the time and place in which it was written but for what it tells us of the painful human condition of most men, women, and children before and since, in America and elsewhere.

For once in his career, Sinclair united his psychic anguish to his intellectual analysis, joined his personal agony to the suffering of this immigrant family. That is why, despite our easy and valid objection to the breakdown of the narrative, The Jungle lives in our imaginations not in pieces but as a sympathy-stirring whole. The publication of The Jungle made Sinclair an international celebrity overnight and earned him thirty thousand dollars within a few months.

But fame and fortune did not bring him health, happiness, or political or artistic success. In fact, Sinclair spent the next decade in a restless search for physical well-being, a permanent base of operations, and new subjects appropriate to his talents as a writer.

In the process, he established a cooperative living colony at Helicon Hall in New Jersey, became a Socialist party candidate for Congress, wrote eight novels, three nonfiction books, several plays, and scores of articles on personal as well as social problems.

From the time Helicon Hall was destroyed by fire, in March , until he settled in Pasadena, California, in , Sinclair was seldom in one place for more than a few months at a time. The first is an expose of upper-class profligacy and venality; the second offers a weak, fictionalized account of J. Samuel the Seeker is a parable of the conversion of a religious seeker to socialism.

In King Coal , Sinclair returned to the subject of The Jungle , the grim life of unorganized industrial workers. In this case, the workers are the miners in the Colorado coalfields, whose attempts to unionize in and had been brutally suppressed, most notably by the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, a Rockefeller subsidiary. As a result of the demonstration, Sinclair was kept in jail for two days.

Indeed, his depiction of the virtual slavery of coal miners and their families in oppressive, isolated company towns was to represent his best fictional work for another decade—until the publication in of Oil! The Profits of Religion offers an outline of the collaboration of institutionalized religion with oppressive regimes in Western history; The Brass Check , for which he drew on his own experiences with the press, reveals the prostitution of journalism to commercial interests; The Goose-Step and The Goslings suggest, respectively, the power of interlocking directorates over higher education and their power over public and parochial schools; Mammonart attacks the class bias of most Western art and artists, while Money Writes!

Perhaps because these books are ideologically simplistic, perhaps because they fed an appetite for scandal and an anti-intellectual strain in American life, they were popular as well as notorious. The publication of Oil! Set chiefly in the oil fields of Southern California, drawing on the events surrounding the Teapot Dome scandal of the Harding administration, and centering on the moral, social, and political education of a young man, Bunny Ross, the novel vividly incorporates many features of American life in the s, from flappers and football games to strikes and political corruption.

For the first time in his career Sinclair also created multidimensional characters whose actions and thoughts manifest their individual natures rather than illustrate ideological positions. The arrest and trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti and their execution in August galvanized liberal and radical opinion in America as no other event before or since, and it was inevitable that Sinclair would seek to call attention to the tragic injustice they paid for with their lives.

Few other works of history or fiction provide such a compelling sense of the dynamics of the decade; no other work offers such a believable portrait of the American immigrant as martyred hero. Sinclair turned fifty soon after Boston was published, but for three more decades his energy and literary output were startlingly prodigious. He wrote more than forty-five books in this period, undertook the financing of a film by the Russian director Sergei Eisenstein ran for governor of California, and remained active in a wide range of liberal and radical social and political causes.

Many of his publications were weak; some were devoted to his persistent interest in religion, psychic phenomena, and alcoholism. His gubernatorial campaign made him a national figure and the massive eleven- volume Lanny Budd series made him, for the first time since The Jungle , a best-selling author.

Though as a Socialist he had been a congressional candidate in , , and , and a gubernatorial candidate in and , these candidacies were nominal. He did not campaign actively—except by writing articles—and his objective was educational. But by the Depression was deep and pervasive, and Sinclair decided that the times required dramatic change. The EPIC campaign, with its espousal of production for use rather than for profit, was bound to provoke powerful opposition, and once Sinclair had won the primary, the major newspapers, the movie industry, and large corporate interests combined forces to attack him with unprecedented ferocity.

Roosevelt was encouraged to move national Democratic policy to the left. More important, as William A. Sinclair continued writing well into his eighties. He died at the age of ninety in As Van Wyck Brooks observed, Sinclair is hard to be right about.

His production as a writer was so large and various that he defies easy categorization. Moreover, Sinclair was not only a writer, or a thinker, or a social and political activist. He was, above all, a moral force in the prophetic American tradition that has its religious roots in William Bradford and its secular branches in Michael Harrington and Ralph Nader. Sinclair early recognized and spent a lifetime decrying the pernicious effects of modern industrial capitalism. From start to finish he was a profoundly passionate believer in the possibility of the redemption of man through the reform of society, a deeply compassionate human being for whom the cause of universal social justice was a consuming calling.

Chapter 7 of Carl S. See Appeal to Reason November 17, : 4. He may, of course, have been attempting to dramatize the occasion in both instances—or he may simply have forgotten the date he left New York. He had announced his intention of organizing the Intercollegiate Socialist Society as early as December 12, ; Sinclair had learned nothing of socialism in eight years of college and was determined that future college students should have the opportunity to learn about Socialist thought, if only outside the normal curriculum.

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New York: Citadel, Dell, Floyd. New York: George H. Doran, Dickstein, Morris. Introduction to The Jungle. New York: Bantam, Downs, Robert B. Afterword to The Jungle. New York: New American Library, Egbert, Donald Drew. Socialism and American Art.

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